Football's Magic Money Tree

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Chester Perry
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 12:17 pm

Bayern , fresh from their 7th title in a row (were you aware that for the first time ever all the winners in the big 5 leagues also won the tile the previous season) are well known for their ability to drive commercial revenue (it is usually the greatest single part of their revenue, often over 50% of it) are to get a renewed deal with Audi worth over a billion euros and it is not even so they can have their name on the shirt or naming rights for the stadium. It is just for being their official car sponsor - apparently they have battered BMW into submission (while Bayern have done it to the rest of the league)

https://www.bavarianfootballworks.com/2 ... sfer-funds" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Will UEFA look at this given Audi's minor shareholding in the club?

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 12:22 pm

That Ken Early article (see post #1128) has sparked another great thread from Simon Chadwick illustrating the tangled web in which the game is being manipulated

https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 7567847425" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 12:30 pm

Someone in UEFA might be going a little-off message here, then again it might just be a UEFA powerplay to appease the European Leagues Organisation while reminding the ECA just who has final say - Politics has become central in our game (unfortunately)

https://www.thestar.com.my/sport/footba ... ting-boss/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 12:36 pm

It has been an interesting few days for RSC Anderlecht

1st they are sanctioned by FIFA for the illegal transfer of minors

http://static.fifa.com/governance/news/ ... l-tra.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

2nd they announce Vincent Kompany as their new coach

https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... ves-fa-cup" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

3rd they fail to qualify for European competition for the 1st time in 55 years

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... ation.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

and don't forget they are still being investigated for potential money laundering - see post #920

edlass
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by edlass » Mon May 20, 2019 1:02 pm

#1129



For Europe’s Soccer Chief, the Outrage Arrives in Waves

A Champions League restructuring and a looming fight with Manchester City have UEFA’s Aleksander Ceferin sitting atop a soccer economy that feels as if it’s pulling itself apart.

“Sometimes,” the UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin said, “we forget how dirty this industry is.”CreditCreditAndreas Solaro/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

BUDAPEST — Facing a floor-to-ceiling window that offered sweeping views of the Danube, the river that flows through 10 European countries, Aleksander Ceferin paused for a moment to consider his words.

Ceferin, a Slovenian lawyer elected in February to a second term as the leader of UEFA, European soccer’s governing body, has become accustomed to carefully tempering his comments, to steering clear of trouble in whatever he chooses to say publicly, but this month he knows his every word will be parsed even more than usual.

In the past week alone, UEFA has found itself fighting fires on three fronts. First, there was criticism of a behind-the-scenes effort to reshape the Champions League, club soccer’s most important competition and UEFA’s financial engine, by effectively excluding most of Europe from the tournament. Then came anger from England over the choice of Azerbaijan’s capital, Baku, as the host of next week’s Europa League final. But the loudest fury arrived on Monday, when the newly crowned English champion Manchester City learned, through a report by The New York Times, that it could be facing a Champions League ban related to an investigation into its finances.

Each problem sat squarely on the desk of Ceferin last week in his temporary office, a converted suite in a luxury hotel in Budapest. And each will test his ability to balance the competing interests of rich clubs and small leagues, to defend his integrity amid serious accusations from powerful interests, and to navigate a difficult moment for European soccer in which some are questioning UEFA’s ability — and even its willingness — to enforce its rules.

“Sometimes,” Ceferin said, “we forget how dirty this industry is.”

Ceferin, 51, is still relatively new to this world. The former president of Slovenia’s soccer federation, he emerged from obscurity to become one of the most powerful men in sports after a scandal removed his predecessor, Michel Platini, from office in 2015. Now three years into the job, Ceferin is facing perhaps the most crucial period of his tenure, and he knows the decisions he and UEFA soon will take could define the future of the European game for a generation or more.

Manchester City’s chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak, right, with the club’s chief executive, Ferran Soriano. City has vowed to fight any effort by UEFA to bar it from the Champions League.CreditJohn Sibley/Reuters

The Champions League is perhaps the most significant issue, since the plan put forward earlier this month — proposed and favored by a group of the biggest clubs from the richest leagues — could upend an already-frayed ecosystem in which resource-poor clubs risk being pushed further to the margins, and all but excluded from the continent’s elite tournaments.

The plans leaked after a meeting Ceferin and his executive committee held with a group representing Europe’s domestic leagues. The leagues denounced the plan, with the most vocal of their leaders, Javier Tebas of the Spain’s La Liga, darkly suggesting that UEFA had no interest in listening to stakeholders beyond a small cartel of top clubs.

Tebas’s reaction, according to Ceferin, was designed to stoke public anger. If so, it worked. Fans and commentators almost immediately took to social media to reject the proposal. Ceferin likened some of the loudest voices to a new breed of politicians who stoke anger to fuel their movements.

“Look,” he said, “one way of operating is shouting, ‘The rich will take everything!’ And this is typical of the populist shouting in European politics.”

“He’s loud,” Ceferin added of Tebas. “I think it’s part of his tactics to operate like that. But I don’t think it’s very productive.”

Neither Tebas nor anyone else, he noted, had proposed an alternative. And anyway, Ceferin insisted, nothing has been decided yet — except for the fact that matches in European competitions will not be played on the weekends, a guarantee that was announced Friday. The bigger clubs had sought those windows to maximize the attractiveness and value of Champions League games to broadcasters, even if it threatened to severely damage the marketability, and perhaps even the viability, of domestic leagues.

Ceferin was elected on a platform that championed support for Europe’s small- and medium-sized soccer nations, regions that have seen the power of their clubs eroded by the ubiquitous popularity of a handful of top teams and leagues whose televised matches are often more popular than the in-person domestic alternative. That influence is the real imbalance, Ceferin said.

While UEFA, which pays $240 million each year to Europe’s national leagues in so-called solidarity payments, the continent’s behemoths — the Premier League, Bundesliga and La Liga — pay nothing to their continental counterparts. Ceferin suggested that must change.

“Solidarity means not only solidarity from the UEFA’s side, but also the Big Five leagues who sell rights to the small countries and affect directly the revenues of the local leagues,” he said.

With so much at stake, and opponents circling, Ceferin’s personal conduct — particularly his close friendship with the Juventus president Andrea Agnelli, who helped draw up the Champions League restructuring plan — has come under scrutiny.

The Juventus president Andrea Agnelli, who is pushing a plan to remake the Champions League, asked Ceferin, a close friend, to be the godfather to his daughter.CreditFabio Frustaci/EPA, via Shutterstock

He says that he has heard the stories about how Agnelli arranged for Ceferin to take a spin in a Ferrari (Ceferin said that he has never sat in one); about the private jet trips on the Italian’s plane (they have never even flown commercial together, Ceferin said); and even the whispers about the motivation behind Agnelli’s decision to choose Ceferin to be the godfather to his six-month old daughter (Ceferin called it an “honor,” one that transcended soccer).

Still, the close relationship between the men and their families and his decision to accept Agnelli’s offer to serve as godfather at such a delicate time professionally has raised eyebrows in soccer circles, given the high stakes of the Champions League negotiations, with several officials privately raising the issue in recent weeks.

“Those rumors in football that are shared all the time are so illogical, and so stupid,” he added. “One day it is Agnelli is important, and he can influence everything because of my personal friendship with him. Next day P.S.G. is, because they are buying are rights. Then the third day we help only Real Madrid, and that’s why they were four times in the final.”

Meting out potential punishment to Manchester City is a different, and potentially more serious, problem for Ceferin and UEFA. City, a global billboard of sorts for the ruling family of Abu Dhabi, has vowed to defend itself to the bitter end in the face of a potential Champions League ban. If it succeeds in avoiding punishment, as Qatari-owned P.S.G. has done while facing similar accusations of violating financial controls, that could alter the balance of power in European soccer in an era of nation-state club owners.

Ceferin said he would not comment on the case while it is continuing, and besides, he added, it’s in the hands of an independent panel whose work he has no control over. But he rejected the suggestion that UEFA would shy away from sanctioning any club, whether it was an exceedingly wealthy one like Manchester City or a rich and well-connected one like P.S.G., whose chairman, Nasser el-Khelaifi, sits on UEFA’s executive committee at the same time he controls the organization’s broadcast partner beIN Sports.

“If you do it right, you don’t sell yourself, if you are not involved in any strange business, if you are not corrupted, then you go straight forward and be fair to anyone,” Ceferin said.
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Chester Perry
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 1:04 pm

That message that tv audiences want unpredictability (see post #1132) is not universally accepted, I have previously posted how audiences in the East tend to follow players rather than clubs. This article shows research that audiences in fact just want to see the big stars perform at their best, you can here the joy cry out from the ECA

https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... -cup-final" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 1:10 pm

Thanks edlass - somehow I had missed the news about about definite block on weekends for European Club competitions, It is very welcome though

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 1:29 pm

Liverpool have announced a new training kit sponsor, paying a reputed £20m a season for the privilege, while we now have a valuation for Southampton's new shirt sponsor as being £7.5m (a record for them).

https://offthepitch.com/a/kit-deal-move ... lubs-world" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Look at those 2 figures for a minute, one is for training kit only and one is for the main shirt on view every week in the PL. That Liverpool deal is more than half the PL clubs (including ourselves) make from all their commercial activities in a season, and as of next season 8 PL clubs will earn less from TV monies as a result of clubs like Liverpool forcing through changes in the distribution on TV monies - not to mention all the EFL clubs who get solidarity payments which are dropping for the same reason next season. That £20m is more than what Leagues 1 and 2 get combined in Solidarity payments

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 1:47 pm

If anyone is worried that Man City have been getting a lot of stick recently, try this

News broke today about the wages being earned in Qatar by migrants building the stadium's for the World cup
https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-new ... t-16170439" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

the first of which opened to much fanfare and appreciation last week
https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 7392456704" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Of course Qatar is more widely known for it's state ownership of PSG, Bein sports and it's rapid rise to prominence in the Asian Football Confederation, UEFA (Chair of both PSG and Bein Sports sits on the Executive committee) and FIFA.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 1:57 pm

Is Kylian Mbappe after a pay rise? or just fluttering his eyes at Madrid in one of their carefully orchestrated moves

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/20 ... -want-new/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

He is 20 has won a world cup already together with a few domestic trophies (will in all probability be a billionaire before he is 30) and now suggests he is at turning point in his career.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 2:07 pm

We know much about the difficulties of being a small fish in the big pond in the PL and Championship and thanks to the likes of @AndyhHolt in Leagues 1 and 2 also, but what about further down the pyramid?

This tweet from the Chairman of Witton Albion shows the battle is just as fierce to stand still at that level too.

https://twitter.com/WittonAlbion/status ... 6397604864" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 2:10 pm

looking back on todays posts I have to say how much I love having a thread that is so diverse and yet so thematically bound - thanks to all who read and contribute it keeps me going
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 3:06 pm

as though we didn't know - see post #1140 - PSG in talks to extend Mbappe's contract

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/20 ... nsibility/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 5:55 pm

John Nicholson aims his ire at football pricing based on Market forces (not unlike a number of others as we have seen) in is usual rambunctious manner

https://www.football365.com/news/f-mark ... every-turn" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Mon May 20, 2019 6:42 pm

Chester Perry wrote:@AndyhHolt has another go at "fit and proper" following yesterday's fall out - he is definitely wanting to create a something solid he can take to the EFL here.

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/11 ... 9490336768" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

he has also brought up the topical issue of ground sale (to a friendly party) to increase budget to have a crack at promotion (don't believe he actually would do it) and that appears to be the response of Accy fans

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/11 ... 6348037121" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Interesting that Andy Holt sees a ground sale as even a consideration. Surely it won't happen.

Of course we had a seven year period, 2006 to 2013, when our Club did not own Turf Moor. One day the full story will emerge as to how close we came to failing to return the Turf to it's rightful ownership and the additional cost required to make sure it happened.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 6:58 pm

Royboyclaret wrote:Interesting that Andy Holt sees a ground sale as even a consideration. Surely it won't happen.

Of course we had a seven year period, 2006 to 2013, when our Club did not own Turf Moor. One day the full story will emerge as to how close we came to failing to return the Turf to it's rightful ownership and the additional cost required to make sure it happened.
He was using it as a test of a hypothesis that fans (of his club at least) want stability and security of existence over the risk/reward scenario - don't think one fan voted for the risk/reward, though not surprising given the history of the club, he acknowledges that at bigger clubs the mentality is different

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Mon May 20, 2019 7:24 pm

Chester Perry wrote:He was using it as a test of a hypothesis that fans (of his club at least) want stability and security of existence over the risk/reward scenario - don't think one fan voted for the risk/reward, though not surprising given the history of the club, he acknowledges that at bigger clubs the mentality is different
Mel Morris at Derby clearly considered the risk was well worth the potential reward (was it a £40m valuation of the Ricoh?).

The important thing to ensure is that, when the ground is ready to be returned to it's rightful ownership, the relevant clauses are inserted into the contract.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 8:18 pm

£80m for Pride Park Roy - Though he has grand plans to develop the site to give more revenue

https://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/news/b ... ans-819597" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I assume that these restaurants would be open through the week given that is is a business industrial area that is about to grow substantially (don't believe Morris owns that bit though)

https://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/news/b ... on-2752696" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Mon May 20, 2019 8:30 pm

Of course, for some reason I had Coventry City on my mind.

Have we debated Derby on this thread previously, Chester?

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon May 20, 2019 9:34 pm

Not that I can recall Roy, bit surprising considering how they have dodged FFP this last couple of years - of course given their popularity on the board there may have been a specific thread

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Tricky Trevor » Mon May 20, 2019 10:09 pm

Chester Perry wrote: it is entirely possibly that a lot of this summers biggest potential transfers might not happen because one agent has been given a 3 month ban - initially in Italy, then FIFA made it worldwide - He is allowed to return to his business activities the day after the PL transfer windows shut. This is going to be an interesting watch given the players under his charge and if effective may leave an awful lot of clubs unhappy as they can either not get rid of players they want to or sign the players they are targeting
Surely, in this instance the player would be within his rights to walk away from an agent who is unable to fulfill his duties. Pogba would not be happy staying at ManU until January.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 10:21 am

I don't know the answer to that Trevor, but it is telling that none of his players seem to be making any noise about finding another agent and a lot of them are expecting to move this summer and it is usually him that decides which club they go to

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 10:21 am

A detailed and **WARNINING** very long article from Middle East Eye on the whole Man City thing with a lot of stuff not previously reported in there - It is well worth the read,


Manchester City, Abu Dhabi and the rise of English football's new order - Oscar Rickett

The club bought by Sheikh Mansour of the UAE has become the Premier League's dominant force and a potent PR vehicle

Walk east along the tram line from Manchester's Piccadilly station and you will pass an abandoned pub called the Bank of England, boarded-up old houses and a car wash with a couple of workers in overalls sitting outside waiting for their next job.

Pass the car wash and continue up the road, and after five minutes you reach a Mercedes dealership, which sits like a guard tower outside the Etihad Stadium, home to Manchester City Football Club. The name of the United Arab Emirates’ second-largest airline can be seen everywhere.
Behind the stadium, there's the Etihad campus, a vast sweep of land populated with training pitches, a school, offices, shops, the Manchester Institute of Health and Performance, a "woodland fitness trail" and much more besides.

In the club's shop, employees tell Middle East Eye that the biggest-selling shirts are the ones you'd expect: Sergio Aguero, Raheem Sterling, Kevin De Bruyne.

These are the footballers who have fired City to a second successive English Premier League title and their fourth since 2012, justifying the money spent on them by the club's owner, Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan, a prominent member of Abu Dhabi's ruling family.

After claiming the title last Sunday, the UAE's foreign minister, Anwar Gargash, tweeted in Arabic congratulating Mansour and paying tribute to his and City's "historic achievement" and "legendary success". It was, Gargash wrote, "among the most remarkable stories in the history of football".
He's not wrong. On Saturday, Manchester City face Watford in the FA Cup final, sponsored by Emirates, another airline from the UAE. If City win, they will become the first team in the history of English football to win a domestic treble of trophies - the league title, the FA Cup and the League Cup.

Over the past 10 years, Sheikh Mansour has put at least £1.3bn ($1.6bn) into the club. In return, the team's fans have unfurled banners thanking him, sung songs to him and worn homemade tea-towel keffiyehs honouring their oil-rich owners.

In more than a century of existence prior to Sheikh Mansour's arrival, City had won the English league title just twice, enjoying occasional periods of success but often bouncing between divisions and playing in the third tier of English football as recently as 1999.

"Never thought when watching City lose to Tranmere many years ago we'd be the best ever Premier League team and on the cusp of winning the domestic treble," City fan Tony told a BBC radio phone-in on Friday night.

"If you are a Manchester City supporter right now, you are living the absolute dream."

'Double-edged sword'
Premier League football "is one of the best entertainment products in the world," the UAE’s deputy prime minister wrote when he bought the club in 2008, and the City Football Group, under the ownership of Abu Dhabi United Group, is well on its way to becoming an Emirati-funded Amazon or Disney, running a string of football clubs from the US to Uruguay, Spain to China.

New York City Football Club, like Melbourne City and their parent club, Manchester City, play in sky blue, with "Etihad Airways" on the front of their shirts.

They aim to play in the style City's manager, Pep Guardiola, a Champions League winner with Barcelona as a player and a coach and whose possession and passing-based philosophy is synonymous with the Catalan club, exhorts his team to play.

As such, football, the most-watched sport in the world, has become a global advert for Abu Dhabi and a way of exercising the UAE's "Soft Power Strategy". But, as Nicholas McGeehan, the former UAE researcher for Human Rights Watch says, City's owners are "wise to the fact that it's a double-edged sword".

As the Australian Simon Pearce, a director of Manchester City and Abu Dhabi's head of strategic communications, put it in a leaked email written in 2013 regarding the club's move to New York: "AD/UAE vulnerabilities put in play: gay, wealth, women, Israel."

The success, then, of Manchester City has also brought some fresh attention to long-standing criticisms of the UAE. "This is one of the most abusive and dangerous governments out there," says McGeehan. "They are particularly sinister and dangerous."

Serious mistreatment of the migrant workers that make up 90% of the population, vast inequalities in wealth, environmental degradation, oppressive policies aimed at women and gay people, torturing prisoners and embarking on a war that has killed thousands of innocent people in Yemen: all these allegations against the UAE have been brought, however hazily, to the attention of some of the hundreds of millions of people that watch the English Premier League around the world.

This is particularly true for fans of City's rivals looking for a stick to beat their conqueror with, and particularly true in an ever more polarised football landscape, in which fan sites and podcasts have risen to prominence and supporters across the world vent at each other on Twitter.
In return, fans of the Manchester club have become what McGeehan calls an "unpaid PR army" for Abu Dhabi, defending the UAE on social media and pointing out that when it comes to supposedly dodgy owners of Premier League football clubs, City are very much not alone.

"Dig deep enough and you'll find murky business in every club's financial dealings – where there's money, there's a lot of questionable characters and practices," says David Mooney, a life-long City fan and host of the Blue Moon podcast.

Fellow fan Howard Hockin, who runs the 93:20 podcast, makes a similar point. "The UK government is just as bad as the UAE government. There is a lot of Western arrogance surrounding this," he says.

In Manchester, the men of oil-rich Abu Dhabi get a lot more love than that UK government. From time to time, City fans in the Etihad break out a chant that pays homage to their owner. To the tune of spiritual classic Kum Ba Ya, they sing "Sheikh Mansour m'lord, Sheikh Mansour, oh lord, Sheikh Mansour".

Mansour has attended one Manchester City game during more than a decade of ownership.

A Gulf state whose territory was once controlled by the British, the UAE is now calling the shots, its rulers thanked and honoured by men and women at a football ground in the north of England.

But as it aims to make domestic football history, Manchester City face another kind of off-field headache, as Europe's footballing body, UEFA ,threatens to ban it from the Champions League for violating financial fair play regulations by funnelling Sheikh Mansour's money through inflated sponsorship deals. The giant of east Manchester is being forced to swat away assorted slings and arrows.

Labour Club to superclub
On match days, Mary D's, a bar that sits just across the road from one corner of the Etihad stadium, is only open to City fans. Hundreds regularly crowd inside the main bar, take to its dance floor and fill out its outside space at the back. Pictures of players past and present line the walls.
The large patio at the back has shirts hanging down from the roof covering and the dance floor is decorated with homemade tributes to the City players who drove the team to 100 points in the league last season. Aguero and Sterling are shown with Roman helmets on, the horsehair trim on the crest coloured City blue.

The Beamish Bar hasn't always been a temple dedicated to the gods of Manchester City. Beswick, the area of east Manchester the Etihad stadium sits in, traditionally belongs to Manchester's other, more famous, football team: Manchester United.

For years, Mary D's was also the Bradford Labour Club, a home for the working people of the area. Manchester, cradle of the industrial revolution, home to the football club that has spent more money than any other in the world over the last decade, is one of the most deprived local authorities in the UK.

In 1993, an Irishman called Mike Kehoe bought the bar and took over its management. In those days, Manchester City were still playing at Maine Road, which had been their ground from 1923. Maine Road is in Moss Side, south of Manchester's city centre and about five kilometres from what is now the Etihad Stadium. The club's traditional support is drawn from those areas, not from east Manchester.

From the 1980s onwards, as government cuts, the march of global capitalism and the closing down of industry devasted large areas of the United Kingdom, Manchester's city council became adept at bidding for one-off pots of money as a way of trying to make up for the straitened circumstances they found themselves in.

In 2002, Manchester hosted the Commonwealth Games. The City of Manchester stadium was built for the event, but it needed an afterlife. Manchester City, in turmoil but still commanding loyal crowds of over 30,000 people, was the obvious choice.

On a Monday afternoon, the regulars drinking in the main bar are all United fans, despite the City-themed decor.

Tommy, Steve and Colin are all in their early 50s. Tommy is a window fitter. He grew up in Beswick and has lived here all his life.

"What I love about this place is that I could get drunk tonight and walk back home through my estate completely naked, and no one would mind," he says.

He lives in a community. There isn't much money and there isn't much opportunity, but people know and look out for each other. And, apart from on match days, they’ve still got their local pub: Mary D's.

A shadow hangs over this. You can see it from outside the bar: the Etihad Stadium and all it represents. For years, the residents of Beswick have been waiting to find out what Manchester City Football Club and Manchester City Council want to do with them and the place they live in.

"The club wants to flatten the area, but the community doesn't know what's going on," Tommy says.

Will the oil wealth of Abu Dhabi pour out into Beswick, uprooting this working class community, flattening the council housing and replacing it with loft apartments and an as-yet imagined upwardly mobile demographic, working who knows where and doing who knows what?

At Mary D's, the punters don't know. They feel like they are in purgatory. They feel like some lines from an old song of Manchester City's: "We're not really here, we're not really here, just like the fans of the Invisible Man, we're not really here."

"We just want to know what's going on,” says Tommy, his words echoed by friends at the bar. He has two daughters and wonders for their future. He bought his council house for £14,000 ($17,800) and now it's worth £150,000 ($191,000).

Like most of his fellow residents, Tommy would most likely make a substantial profit if Manchester City bought him out, but like most of his fellow residents, he doesn't want to move to another part of the city. "It's your community, and you don't want to leave," he says.

The community shares a feeling of resignation. It's David versus Goliath, they say, it's just that in this telling of the story, Goliath wins.
"They're Arabs with billions of pounds, what can we do?" Tommy asks.

The club still advertises jobs at the club that pay below £9 an hour ($11.40), which is considered the living wage in the area. It still outsources recruitment to outside companies. This certainly doesn't make it unique in the Premier League.

Only four of 20 clubs in England's top division – West Ham, Chelsea, Liverpool and Everton – have signed up to the Living Wage Foundation's definition of what a living wage for workers is.

Knocking up some signs in the car park of Mary D's, Mike Kehoe, the bar's owner, understands how his punters feel, but he has a different take on the situation, partly because it's working out well for him financially and partly because, as a City fan, it's worked out well for him personally.
The building of the City of Manchester stadium and the arrival of Manchester City across the road from his bar was a dream come true for Kehoe. When the team he loved pitched up next door to his pub, he turned the place into a shrine for City fans and hasn't looked back since.
Kehoe is relatively upbeat when it comes to Abu Dhabi's ownership of the club. "In my opinion, it's got better," he says, pointing to the club's investment in a local gym and school. "They do a lot in the community, and as a fan it's been great."

The Irishman echoes a point made by the Guardian journalist David Conn in Richer Than God, his profound and personal investigation into Manchester City and modern football: these men representing Abu Dhabi are "world-class business people".

For Kehoe as a bar owner, the arrival of the club means fans pouring through the doors on match days and people from all over the world coming to soak up the atmosphere.

Still, he sees why his local customers – his friends – feel the way they do. In return, Tommy, Steve and Colin laugh about Mike's fondness for the club: "He would say that, he's making money." But just as the future is uncertain for those drinking in the bar, it's not entirely clear for Mike and Mary D's.

'Exemplary business partners'
Manchester City Council make no assurances about what will happen to Mary D's, Kehoe says. The council of a city proud of its radical past seems to have a somewhat cosy relationship with Abu Dhabi.

In 2016, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch wrote to Manchester leaders on the eve of the anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre, an 1819 incident in Manchester when cavalry fatally charged a more than stadium-sized crowd that had been demanding parliamentary reform amid grim post-war economic conditions. While fewer than 20 died, up to 700 were injured. The two modern-day organisations asked the council to "take some simple and principled steps that would support victims of serious human rights violations and ensure Manchester's commercial relationships with senior figures in the UAE government do not besmirch the city's reputation".

Sir Richard Leese, leader of Manchester City Council, responded, calling the rulers of Abu Dhabi "exemplary business partners" and saying that the "alleged" abuses detailed in the letter were beyond Manchester's control.

These exemplary partners had come to town at a time when Manchester City was once again in trouble, and not for the first time. The club had been through a number of false dawns, and David Conn, for one, had already lost faith in the spiritual purity of football, long before Sheikh Mansour arrived.

Investigating the economics of football as a reporter, Conn became profoundly disillusioned. The gap between the shared experience of playing and watching a game and the money-driven business of the Premier League, with its Murdoch-run television coverage and its billionaire owners, was simply too wide.

And he saw it all unfold at his beloved City. After Sheikh Mansour took over, Conn went to Abu Dhabi, where an American businessman told him that the Emiratis were "richer than god".

City were in dire straits when Sheikh Mansour arrived to save the day. Thaksin Shinawatra, the former prime minister of Thailand, had bought the club in 2007. Briefly dubbed "Frank Sinatra" by City fans and branded a "human rights abuser of the worst kind" by Human Rights Watch, Shinawatra sold up after only a season in charge.

Garry Cook, the club's Shinawatra-appointed CEO, when asked about the human rights and corruption charges levelled at his boss, had declared that Thaksin was a "great guy to play golf with." Cook was now charged with finding a new owner.

The former Nike man, who was fond of mid-Atlantic brand speak and had once worked closely with Michael Jordan, was introduced to Amanda Staveley, ex-girlfriend of Prince Andrew, and Ali Jassim, an adviser to Sheikh Mansour.

Staveley regularly acts as an intermediary between the Gulf and the City of London, and she and Jassim were also helping Mansour buy a multi-billion pound stake in Barclays bank, at the height of the global financial crisis.

In August 2008, as detailed in Joshua Robinson and Jonathan Clegg’s book The Club, Cook made a presentation to Staveley and Jassim at the City of Manchester stadium. He told them that whoever bought the club would be buying a piece of global legitimacy, a rolling PR campaign devoured by audiences all over the world.

"Nobody had ever heard of Roman Abramovich until he bought Chelsea Football Club," Cook said, referring to the Russian oligarch who had been at the forefront of the wave of foreign investment in Premier League football.

"If you're developing your nation and you're looking to be on a global stage, we are your proxy brand for the nation," Cook told Abu Dhabi's representatives.

The price was not important because you couldn't put a price on, in Robinson and Clegg's words, a "PR campaign that played fifty games a year to an audience of millions". For an image-conscious billionaire in the 21st century, a Premier League football team "was a must-have accessory".

"We all appreciate that Mansour didn't love City," says Howard Hockin, the fan and podcaster. "Abu Dhabi is an up-and-coming country, and it wanted to boost its profile. It's a PR thing, and we're fine with that."

On that day in Manchester, at the meeting with Mansour's representatives, Garry Cook was sending a message to the UAE: this football club is a blank canvas, paint whatever you want on it.

At the time, Manchester City's manager was Mark Hughes, who was nine years older than the UAE. A part of the world once known for pearl diving and piracy, and now known for vast oil wealth, Abu Dhabi was turning the tables on its former British protectors, buying up their long-standing institutions. The deal was done.

Abu Dhabi is the wealthiest and most powerful of the seven emirates that comprise the UAE. The man who controls Abu Dhabi and dictates its policy is Sheikh Mansour's brother, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed, commonly known as MBZ.

Manchester City's chairman, the US-educated Khaldoon Al Mubarak, is a key lieutenant of MBZ's and is also the CEO of Mubadala, a corporation with upwards of $50bn in assets, investing vast sums of money in anything from real estate to pharmaceuticals.

Manchester City Football Club is just one of many, many investments, but it is also the investment that, Mubarak admits, has brought by far the most attention, both good and bad.

The financial fair play cloud hanging over City has its origins in a series of articles published by the German magazine Der Spiegel. The series was built around leaked internal communication that appeared to show the club using Abu Dhabi's money to pay for sponsorships, with Simon Pearce, Abu Dhabi's branding guru, writing that "we can do what we want".

As UEFA's investigation into the club is sent for its final judgement, Manchester City has hit out at what it calls a "unsatisfactory, curtailed and hostile process," describing the allegations against the club as "entirely false".

The footballing sidesteps Manchester City have been accused of taking are mirrored in the contrast between the brand Abu Dhabi projects and the actions it takes both at home and in the Middle East.

Nicholas McGeehan, now an independent human rights researcher, believes that the new level of infamy enjoyed by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman following the murder last October of journalist Jamal Khashoggi has somewhat obscured the ongoing machinations of Mohammed bin Zayed and the UAE.

MBZ, after all, is considered to have played the role of a mentor figure to the younger Saudi royal. In a nice twist of fate, rumours that Mohammed Bin Salman is looking to take over Manchester United - rumours he denies - will not go away.

"The UAE has been heavily involved in pushing this stable, authoritarian, anti-Islamist line – it's led the way," McGeehan tells MEE.

"They don't care about sport," McGeehan says. "And they don't care about football. They're interested in power and money, and that's why they are interested in football. It's incredibly sophisticated the way they use it."

'An ordinary man'
For British football fans, attention was drawn to this in May 2018, when Matthew Hedges, a British PhD student who was in the UAE on a research trip, was arrested at Dubai International Airport on suspicion of spying on behalf of the British government. Hedges was detained for seven months, handed a life sentence and then pardoned following an international outcry.

Speaking to Middle East Eye, Hedges' wife Daniela Tejada says it's important football fans realise that her husband is "an ordinary man and a football fan," just like them.

When asked about Guardiola, City's manager, who is paid $19m per year and has shown his support for Catalan prisoners of conscience but refuses to answer questions about his bosses in Abu Dhabi, Tejada's response is blunt: "I wish I was offended by someone I can't take seriously, but his mouth is in the pocket of the UAE."

Tejada doesn't have a problem with Manchester City fans. She doesn't even have a problem with Abu Dhabi owning the club. But, she says, "You can tell football fans to make certain demands of their club, and to say that they won't do certain things – like going to a match – if the owners act a particular way."

Boycotting matches, she believes, would "send a message to the world and to the funders of the club".

What Tejada tells MEE about her husband's detention gives an insight into what City's beautiful, trophy-winning football washes away. Hedges was kept in a soundproof, windowless office for six months. The light alternated between blinding white and complete darkness. He was allowed no form of distraction.

Tejada says her husband was forced onto a potent cocktail of medication that included anti-depressants, anti-anxiety pills, sleeping pills and antihistamines. He remains dependent on these drugs. "The dose has been reduced to nearly a tenth of what he was on in the UAE, but he still needs to take them to function," she says.

The British academic has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. He can wake up feeling full of energy and then, his wife says, "go swiftly downhill to be on his own with no form of distraction," thus replicating the conditions he was kept in while in detention.

"People's lives don't go back to normal just because they are released," Tejada says.

The British government has offered little support. "I bought into the story that Britain stood up for its citizens, and that it didn't put its financial interests first. I've been proven wrong," she says.

At the time of publication, Manchester City had not responded to Middle East Eye's repeated requests for comment regarding the concerns of the local community, human rights issues in the UAE, the Matthew Hedges case and Pep Guardiola's support for the Catalan independence movement.
'Racist' criticism

For the most part, Manchester City fans are happy to take the success they've been given. After all, most of them formed an attachment to the club long before Abu Dhabi came into town in its oil and gas-powered plane. Many go further, defending the club and even now calling criticism of the UAE "racist".

"The word 'Arab' is used in derogatory terms," says Howard Hockin.

"It's such bullshit," says McGeehan. "It's just bullshit that the criticism is racist. They've come up with this line recently. Suddenly the narrative is, 'Oh, you're racist for criticising the UAE'. It's ********."

The Matthew Hedges case spiked an interest in human rights abuses, but without a British or Western angle – notwithstanding the fact that Britain is a long-time ally and supplier of arms to the UAE - McGeehan believes that there is always a danger the attention being paid to the situation will drop away.

"When it comes to the war in Yemen, or Libya, or general torture in the Gulf, the number of people up in arms is limited," he says.

David Mooney, a City fan since the early 1990s, says that he really struggles with the question of Sheikh Mansour's ownership.

He says he's not up to speed on the allegations, but that he accepts this could be considered a cop out. He doesn't really like it when fellow fans try to take ownership for what Abu Dhabi is doing in the city of Manchester.

"What I suppose adds an extra layer to this is that I'm a gay City fan," Mooney tells MEE, "and so neither me nor my partner would be able to be ourselves in the UAE. A quick Google search will show what LGBT rights are like in the country."

And indeed it does, with all sexual relations outside of heterosexual marriage a crime and a range of extreme punishment meted out to those who break this law.

Leaving the club as a legend in 2018, the midfielder Yaya Toure, who came to City from Barcelona in 2010, gave a speech on the pitch at the Etihad in which he thanked Mansour and al-Mubarak.

"I think those guys have been so magnificent for the fans, because City has been so long in the shadow of United, and I think those guys bring happiness to the fans," he said, before thanking the supporters.

Those fans, along with Guardiola, cheered and clapped for their Emirati benefactors. The club tweeted out the speech with a heart emoji.
After decades in the shadows of their city rivals, City had knocked United off their perch and the people to thank first and foremost were in Abu Dhabi. City played sensational football, and the people to thank were in Abu Dhabi.

These triumphs, this success, the intoxicating feeling of victory and the aesthetic delight of Guardiola's teams: it is all a gift from the Gulf.
And in return, City fans pay homage to their owners, defending them on social media and championing their stewardship of the club because they know that it is the UAE that has given them this epoch of ascendency, in which they get to lord over not just their grand old neighbours but the rest of the country.

On the way back into central Manchester from the Etihad stadium, the beaten-up boozers and dilapidated council housing give way to building sites with slick corporate advertising hoardings displaying visions of sophisticated modern living.

Some of the developments belong to Manchester Life Development Company, which is owned by Manchester City Council and the Abu Dhabi United Group, a private investment and development company owned by Sheikh Mansour. Passers-by are afforded a glimpse at what they are told will be "five star luxury".

The cranes hang high and the towers rise up. Behind them, scenes of deprivation are still visible. At home, we sit on sofas and watch football, a game turned entertainment product, an intoxicating opium of the masses for this world we live in. We think about where all the money comes from. We try not to think about where all the money comes from.

"We're all hypocrites," says Howard Hockin. "Most fans attacking us don't care about human rights in the Middle East. I should care but I don't. I should care about where my shoes come from – if they've been made by slave labour – but I don't. I don't look to football for my moral code. I don't think I've sold my soul to support Man City."

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by aggi » Tue May 21, 2019 10:54 am

Royboyclaret wrote:Tend to agree that Manchester City's dominance of the game will ultimately result in it's ruination. Will it be the treble again next year and the year after. Is that what the game really wants?

As an aside, what was the disagreement today between Emirates and Etihad? Did one attempt to upstage the other?
I'm less convinced. This season for instance they won the Carabao Cup on penalties, the league by one point and they didn't even make the finals of the champions league. That's not really an all-conquering team.

These things tend to come in waves and there are enough well-funded english clubs that I can't see Man City's dominance being perpetual.

In my view it won't be the big teams scrapping with each other and their spells of dominance that will ruin the game, it will be the big clubs banding together and taking ever more of the TV money that will do for it. Once the playing field becomes too far tilted in the favour of the big clubs, that's when my interest will start to wane.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Tue May 21, 2019 11:51 am

aggi wrote:I'm less convinced. This season for instance they won the Carabao Cup on penalties, the league by one point and they didn't even make the finals of the champions league. That's not really an all-conquering team.

These things tend to come in waves and there are enough well-funded english clubs that I can't see Man City's dominance being perpetual.

In my view it won't be the big teams scrapping with each other and their spells of dominance that will ruin the game, it will be the big clubs banding together and taking ever more of the TV money that will do for it. Once the playing field becomes too far tilted in the favour of the big clubs, that's when my interest will start to wane.
No argument with any of that, in fact we're already seeing evidence with the redistribution of overseas TV merit money which will result in nearly a half of PL teams receiving less in total from broadcast Income in '19/'20 than they did in '18/'19.

But (and it's a big but) I'm certain that these world-class business people from Abu Dhabi and indeed the owners of the country will do whatever is required to ensure Man City stay top of the pile on a consistent basis. That, long-term, cannot be good for the health of the game.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 12:49 pm

I have not seen it announced anywhere, but the spare package in the domestic premier league rights has been picked up by BT. It is similar to the Amazon one - midweek games with all 10 games in each of the 2 rounds to be broadcast live - but the dates are not as attractive.

I found out from this article http://www.sbibarcelona.com/newsdetails/index/403" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; looking at the history of PL rights to the present day - it gives a sound history though is a little out of date when looking forward especial on the payment distribution of overseas rights from next season.

Also with the BT spend being £975m in that article we can deduce that they have paid £90m for that package or £4.5m a game (a bit of simple math from data given here https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... -tv-rights" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; - that is the top-end of the estimate of what Amazon have paid see post #983

Incidentally there are rumours that the PL is having trouble selling rights in some overseas territories including South Korea where no one has created competition for them apparently (behind a paywall and I have no access unfortunately - but all in the title)

https://media.sportbusiness.com/2019/05 ... vaporates/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

This is the PL's own list of territories sold

https://www.premierleague.com/news/970151" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Have we reached peak market?
Are the efforts of La Liga and the Bundesliga impacting in specific overseas markets?
Is the Richard Scudamore shaped vacuum at the PL beginning to take effect?

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 1:04 pm

With bonuses being such an integral part of our wage strategy what are the chances that we employ a hedging strategy - this **sponsored** article in FC Business provides some detail as to how it may work for a club that is budget focussed (such as ourselves)

http://fcbusiness.co.uk/news/interview- ... -planning/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 1:24 pm

with reference to my questions in post #1156 - this from a Financial Times discussion forum on Football Business today

https://twitter.com/jburnmurdoch/status ... 4656169984" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Naturally the games authorities are miles away from being prepared

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/11 ... 2883422208" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

and those that are aware and not part of the winners circle can only hope they remain in existance

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/11 ... 3157920769" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

As I have previously suggested, there are a growing number within the game who suspect that it was the greed of the big six in breaking the equality of distribution was behind Richard Scudamore's decision to quit (he saw what was coming) and the difficulty in finding a replacement see posts ##446, #447, #781 and #994 amongst others

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 2:22 pm

If you want to follow that FT Football Business Summit - you can do here - https://twitter.com/hashtag/FTFootball" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; shame we cannot access real time or read any articles without paying there have been some interesting looking ones recently

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by aggi » Tue May 21, 2019 4:17 pm

Chester Perry wrote:If you want to follow that FT Football Business Summit - you can do here - https://twitter.com/hashtag/FTFootball" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; shame we cannot access real time or read any articles without paying there have been some interesting looking ones recently
I think one of my colleagues is there, will have to ask him about it when I see him.

Very conveniently, being a Spurs fan, he's also at a conference in Madrid the day before the Champions League final ...

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by aggi » Tue May 21, 2019 4:25 pm

Chester Perry wrote: Have we reached peak market?
I think the next big step is new media.

The Premier League are currently still selling pretty traditional packages whereas the next step is going to be VOD, team subscriptions, very specific highlights, etc. and how to do that without excessively cannibalising other deals.

On top of that, once those kind of deals start being struck then it's going to be even more difficult to keep up with the collective bargaining for TV deals rather than Man Utd, etc wanting to negotiate their own supporter deals.

I'm expecting Amazon, Apple and Facebook to get involved at some point (and possibly Google/Youtube and Disney). Amazon are already feeling it out with a cheap deal and generally where one goes the others follow.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 4:40 pm

aggi wrote:I think the next big step is new media.

The Premier League are currently still selling pretty traditional packages whereas the next step is going to be VOD, team subscriptions, very specific highlights, etc. and how to do that without excessively cannibalising other deals.

On top of that, once those kind of deals start being struck then it's going to be even more difficult to keep up with the collective bargaining for TV deals rather than Man Utd, etc wanting to negotiate their own supporter deals.

I'm expecting Amazon, Apple and Facebook to get involved at some point (and possibly Google/Youtube and Disney). Amazon are already feeling it out with a cheap deal and generally where one goes the others follow.
And with that comes the end of collective bargaining and sharing as it will be clearer than ever who is attracting the audiences (the star players) and they will be demanding their share

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 5:47 pm

The Chair of La Liga got a bit tasty at the FT Football Business conference today, as he is wont

https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... -president" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

he also said he would rather have Infantinio's huge Club World Cup than the ECA proposals

https://twitter.com/RobHarris/status/11 ... 2572105729" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

and had a go at FFP and the way UEFA implement them

https://twitter.com/tariqpanja/status/1 ... 7873315842" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

interesting to see just how far down the pecking order Arsenal have fallen given the comments in that article - it is amazing how quickly opinions change as a result of self interest

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 7:16 pm

Of course not everyone takes what Javier Tebas says at face value

https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 9568507904" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 7:47 pm

There has been quite a bit of comment across the media in the past couple of days as to the suitability of FFP one in particular asking the question as to what should FFP be looking at

https://twitter.com/david_conn/status/1 ... 8110985216" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Fitch Ratings have their own views as to it's suitability and likely enforcement given the shared interests

https://www.fitchratings.com/site/pr/10076182" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

It is a shame I cannot access the full report

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 8:04 pm

Following discussion of radical shirt design on the New home kit thread this tweaked my interest,

https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 3461763072" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

What is noticeable is the number of long term partnerships and deals that are materialising at the top of game and their is plenty of innovation going on as that Aston Villa deal linked in the thread testifies.

Fanatics who are the manufacturer and retailer (but not designer) of the Villa kit were part of the previous deal

http://www.sportspromedia.com/analysis/ ... -kit-deals" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

It was a surprise (probably shouldn't have been) to find that Fanatics are under the umbrella of our friends Softbank

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 8:24 pm

That FT Football Business summit is certainly providing a platform to stoke a few fires following Javier Tebas and Man City/PSG/UEFA/ECA we have Leeds Chairman Andrea Radrizzani (also owner of Eleven sports) has taken the opportunity to have another dig at Derby and particularly Mel Morris

https://www.leeds-live.co.uk/sport/leed ... y-16307911" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue May 21, 2019 8:42 pm

Final announcement at the FT Football Business summit today is the full value of the PL overseas rights announced by PL Interim Chief Exec Richard Masters - £4.2bn

https://twitter.com/JonathanPDyson/stat ... 5756821504" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

that gives us the long suspected total of around £9bn or £3bn a season

Edit: almost right - £9.2bn (suspect that includes radio and internet clips)

https://twitter.com/Lu_Class_/status/11 ... 5897080832" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Tue May 21, 2019 10:26 pm

Chester Perry wrote:Final announcement at the FT Football Business summit today is the full value of the PL overseas rights announced by PL Interim Chief Exec Richard Masters - £4.2bn

https://twitter.com/JonathanPDyson/stat ... 5756821504" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

that gives us the long suspected total of around £9bn or £3bn a season

Edit: almost right - £9.2bn (suspect that includes radio and internet clips)

https://twitter.com/Lu_Class_/status/11 ... 5897080832" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
So, if I'm reading this correctly, an annual increase in overseas rights from £815m to £1.4bn.

On the old system that would equate to £70m per club from £40m previously, but we now know an element of that will be merit related. Is that figure 35% merit related, Chester? ......with the rest split equally?

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Tue May 21, 2019 11:47 pm

Struggling to find any confirmation of this 35%/65% split, merit payment/equal split.

Based on those figures, and assuming we finished in 15th again next season, there would still be a significant increase from the season just ended.

65% of £1.4bn split equally over 20 clubs........£45m.

35% of £1.4bn based on merit payments and using the same formula of £1.9m per place as per the current domestic rights.......£11m.

So a total of £56m for '19/'20, which represents an increase of some £15m on the '18/'19 figure.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 12:05 am

Roy everything over the £40m is merit related - that is the base level going forward - merit rewards are calculated on the same basis as the domestic merit rewards http://priceoffootball.com/new-tv-distr ... -a-winner/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So if £585m / 210 = £2.785m then

1st = £55.714m
2nd = £52.928m
3rd = £50.142m
4th = £47.357m
………….

17th = £11.142
18th = £8.357m
19th = £5.571m
20th = £2.785m

you get the picture - remembering that the domestic deal has dropped considerably so effectively the bottom 6 at least are expected to be worse off in comparison, as will those relegated and those receiving solidarity payments as these are calculated on the last place earnings

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 12:22 am

Chelsea appear to have lost their battle with Antonio Conte (see post #616) over his dismissal and will have to pay him £9m outstanding in his contract

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... Conte.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I expect him to take a role in Italy very soon, with this now settled

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 8:41 am

@KieranMaguirre in his regular column for offthepitch.com tries to figure out just who is the most profitable PL club - these are usually behind a paywall so enjoy

https://offthepitch.com/a/which-most-pr ... t-sweating" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 10:08 am

@AndyhHolt with part3 of his "what is wrong with fit and proper"

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/11 ... 9333404672" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Wed May 22, 2019 10:36 am

Chester Perry wrote:@KieranMaguirre in his regular column for offthepitch.com tries to figure out just who is the most profitable PL club - these are usually behind a paywall so enjoy

https://offthepitch.com/a/which-most-pr ... t-sweating" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
The graph of the most profitable PL clubs at the link makes for incredible reading for us on lots of levels, not least the direct comparison with Man United the club we are constantly told is arguably the biggest club side in the world.

So United had a pre-tax operating profit of £44m while Burnley's was £45m with our figure representing a far greater percentage of Income. The Glazers took out £22m in dividends and £24m in interest on loans compared to zero numbers at Burnley on both fronts.

Which club would you most prefer to be associated with?

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 11:26 am

What happens when a country keen to raise it's profile and produce a different story about who and what it is, then gives it's authority to so few in a diverse range of roles - the Chief Exec of Bein Media is charged with corruption during the bidding process for the 2019 world athletics championships that are to be held in Qatar in September. His Chairman at Bein Media is also President of PSG, No 2 at the ECA and on the exec committee at UEFA among other things. Is this Sportswashing writ large.

https://apnews.com/c8b65f267a474850b148d29692a37c27" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 11:37 am

The club appears in strategic disarray even the share price has dropped $400m as analyst wake up to the fact that there is no Champs League next year (approx. £50m lost revenue even with a Europa League win) and a huge rebuild that may include paying off the likes of Sanchez (3 years left on his contract) and selling Pogba (their biggest asset in Eastern markets). Yet the matchday fans appear happy with Ole as they sell out their season tickets in record time

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... paign.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

that share price thing

https://twitter.com/KieranMaguire/statu ... 0811255810" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 1:59 pm

He wasn't always liked when in charge at the FA, but what Mark Palios is doing at Tranmere gives hope that people in charge at the various football authorities will understand the pain within the game

https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/foo ... 23846.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Wed May 22, 2019 2:19 pm

Scrutiny of the Adjudicatory panel presiding of the Man City case at UEFA has begun and immediately picked out one potential conflict of interest

http://www.espn.co.uk/football/manchest ... f-interest" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

As we have learned. this is the way business is done in the East and they will not understand the cause for concern (see post #697) - it is a tangled web that has been allowed to grow unabated and probably too late to stop
This user liked this post: catheasthammurphy

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri May 24, 2019 5:34 pm

Following the previous post about the lieutenant the boss has now been charged with the same offences - this could get very complicated

https://apnews.com/09f2a1ddafa149b29cbb00fd6920e6a5" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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