Football's Magic Money Tree

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Chester Perry
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:41 pm

The Blizzard with a history of televised football - given Bob Lord's infamous stance - I was surprised at how often we feature in the article (and not for that reason which doesn't get mentioned - they prefer to say it was Spurs)

https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/article/football-tv-B5

Chester Perry
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:19 pm

@DrRob_Wilson in a short podcast (20 min) looking at marketing in football - one of the better ones I have come across

https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/3 ... 0463373351

Chester Perry
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:28 pm

I am putting this link up as much as a repository for my own use as yours - Phd Thesis from 1995 - The Premier League and the New Consumption of Football by Anthony King - long and dry as these things tend to be but should be some interesting stuff in there given how much time and effort goes in these things and who has just chosen to post this link on his twitter feed (@parnell_daniel)

https://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/14 ... 194513.pdf

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:35 pm

FIFA releases it's Global transfer report - no surprise that their is a ridiculous amount being spent around the world or where that tends to be concentrated

https://twitter.com/Lu_Class_/status/12 ... 2637453313

the full report

https://resources.fifa.com/image/upload ... oailnncnod

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 4:54 pm

possibly prompted by the latest UEFA investigation into their finances - Man City are looking for a new shirt sponsor - I am assuming not related to the owner directly - they are looking for a big price though

https://www.sportbusiness.com/news/manc ... placement/

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 5:17 pm

I have mentioned this before - Aston Villa have unveiled their newest signing a 16 year old from Barcelona - price £3m - all seems sound but he left West Brom in the summer for a UEFA fixed price, meaning that fee is virtually all profit - a direct transfer between the two midlands clubs would have meant a much higher fee - whatever the reason's given it is disturbing that a clubs profit in this way especially given the relationship between the player and his new boss at Villa (his old Academy boss at West Brom) oh and Barcelona still haven't paid a penny to West Brom yet for the summer switch

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... Barry.html

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Thu Jan 23, 2020 8:44 pm

@AndyhHolt gives a depressing insight into the machinations of the EFL board during Shaun Harvey's reign thanks to a question from @uglygame

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/12 ... 9650486273

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/12 ... 3491196928

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 12:52 am

It seems the FA have been putting their new internationals into a bit of an uncomfortable situation over commercial agreements

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... ances.html

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:35 am

Many of you will be aware of the Saracens relegation that has been in the news - some wish that football could be so strong in the face of such manipulation/contempt of the rules - there are many interpretations of the outcome in the media, including a number that question Lord Dyson's summation - have a read of his report and draw your own conclusion by then taking in the perspective of some of the better outlets out there, then let me know what you think

here is the judgement itself in full https://media-cdn.incrowdsports.com/fa0 ... a67de6.pdf

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 12:10 pm

This is bonkers - Premier League looking to change to a hybrid transfer window - signings from overseas only after the season starts - from the Times

Premier League clubs plan to change transfer window dates
Martyn Ziegler, Chief Sports Reporter - January 24 2020, 12:01am,

Premier League clubs are expected to agree on a new “hybrid” model of the transfer window.

It is thought that having the transfer window shut the day before the start of the season but with international transfers only still permitted after that day will be the preferred option at a vote next month. The alternatives are: a return to the old system where it closes at the end of August; or staying with existing system where it shuts the day before the start of the season.

The options have been explained to club officials at regional meetings with the league, where they have also been updated on the implications of Brexit. The 20 clubs will decide at a meeting on February 6.

Sources say that the hybrid option is the favourite as things stand. It is understood that at least one of the “big six” clubs will push for that option to be adopted, arguing that it will allow Premier League sides to still compete for international players with their European rivals, but will maintain the integrity of the league.

Loans between Premier League clubs would also not be permitted after the start of the season, but transfer activity with Football League clubs would be allowed under the new model.

Clubs have also been told that this summer is the last time they can sign 16 and 17-year-old players from Europe due to Brexit. There will be a transition period for the rest of 2020, after which Fifa rules will kick in meaning any international signings will have to be 18.

There is still no agreement between the FA and the Premier League over work permits post-Brexit. The league wants a global free market with permits given to any player who has a contract with a top-flight club, while the FA will only support that if the minimum of home-grown players in a first-team squad is raised from eight to 12.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Fri Jan 24, 2020 7:27 pm

Chester Perry wrote:
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:41 pm
The Blizzard with a history of televised football - given Bob Lord's infamous stance - I was surprised at how often we feature in the article (and not for that reason which doesn't get mentioned - they prefer to say it was Spurs)

https://www.theblizzard.co.uk/article/football-tv-B5
Very informative article. Interesting that ITV chose the Chelsea v Burnley FA Cup tie in Jan'56 as one of their very first live games, second half only, of course. Bob Lord would by that time have become Chairman, albeit only by a few months. Wonder what his reaction was ?

That was probably the most remarkable set of FA Cup matches in our entire history. It was 4th Round and the original game at Turf Moor which ended in a 1-1 draw. Replay followed at Stamford Bridge, again 1-1 after extra-time. 2nd Replay at St. Andrews Birmingham 2-2 a.e.t. Then 3rd Replay at Highbury Arsenal 0-0 a.e.t, before back to London two days later at White Hart Lane, Tottenham where Chelsea eventually won 2-0. Really not sure which one of those 5 games that ITV decided to televise.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Darnhill Claret » Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:51 pm

I remember a League Cup game on the Turf against Arsenal which I think ended 3-3. I remember Brian O’Neil scoring I think the first of ours at The Cricket Field End and horribly Frank McLintock scoring two for them. I believe it was the first ever Pay Per View game on the ‘new’ pay televisions.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:17 pm

Following Chelsea's shocking financial results for last season - a piece from TIFO Football as to why they need to finish in the top 4 (bizarre that 4 of the big 6 are vying for a single top 4 place and all could yet be beaten by the likes of Wolves)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZzH1mh ... e=emb_logo

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Royboyclaret » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:26 pm

Darnhill Claret wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 8:51 pm
I remember a League Cup game on the Turf against Arsenal which I think ended 3-3. I remember Brian O’Neil scoring I think the first of ours at The Cricket Field End and horribly Frank McLintock scoring two for them. I believe it was the first ever Pay Per View game on the ‘new’ pay televisions.
It was indeed 3-3, and we played them again a couple of days later on the Turf in a League game. Over the course of those two games pretty certain that Arsenal had three players sent off.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:40 pm

As Chelsea announce a new shirt sponsor for the coming 3 years that is thought to be marginally better than the previous deal

https://twitter.com/Lu_Class_/status/12 ... 7729459202
https://twitter.com/mattglen/status/1220744531974545408

Though not as high as previously speculated

https://twitter.com/mattglen/status/1220677461354196994

two major deals are still up for grabs in the Premier League Man City mentioned yesterday and Man Utd - who despite their woes are expected to set a new benchmark again

Simon Chadwick has a bit of fun speculating about a new deal for City

https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 5236930567

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:09 pm

Intriguing article from Barney Ronay in the Guardian about Sky's Gary Neville in Qatar

https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... rney-ronay

those who have read this thread for some time will have seen plenty of detail about Qatar, the bid and the preparations, it is good that a major broadcaster is looking at these things, and even better that they have decided to put the programme on YouTube - so non suscribers can see it for themselves - watch and let me know what you think

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOInEf0yCEc

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Paul Waine » Fri Jan 24, 2020 11:14 pm

Chester Perry wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:35 am
Many of you will be aware of the Saracens relegation that has been in the news - some wish that football could be so strong in the face of such manipulation/contempt of the rules - there are many interpretations of the outcome in the media, including a number that question Lord Dyson's summation - have a read of his report and draw your own conclusion by then taking in the perspective of some of the better outlets out there, then let me know what you think

here is the judgement itself in full https://media-cdn.incrowdsports.com/fa0 ... a67de6.pdf
Hi Chester, I thought I'd give this judgement a read.... but, it's too long for me this evening.

Keep up all the great posts giving us all the chance to be better informed about football's finances.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Fri Jan 24, 2020 11:19 pm

Paul Waine wrote:
Fri Jan 24, 2020 11:14 pm
Hi Chester, I thought I'd give this judgement a read.... but, it's too long for me this evening.

Keep up all the great posts giving us all the chance to be better informed about football's finances.
Thanks for the support Paul - not read it all myself yet - but found this from Brian Moore very useful (especially given his legal background)

https://twitter.com/brianmoore666/statu ... 3426382848
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:08 am

the latest in a series of warning shots from the Government about footballs relationship/dependency on the betting industry comes from the Sports minister - his phrasing suggests things will have to change

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/51242829

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 1:14 pm

Intriguing idea being bounced around by the FA and Premier League in discussions on quotas post Brexit - from the Mail

Premier League clubs who give significant playing time to England-qualified players, such as Chelsea this season, could be rewarded with greater leeway to sign more foreign players after Brexit.

In an innovative idea being discussed by the FA and the Premier League, a system of credits based on playing time has been proposed as a possible alternative to a hard quota for homegrown players, under which clubs who play English youngsters would be given more freedom in the transfer market.

The FA and the Premier League have been unable to agree on an updated quota system. The governing body are pushing for the minimum number of homegrown players in each 25-man squad to be raised from eight to 12 after Brexit, which clubs are resisting.

The alternative credit-based system has emerged in informal talks between the two organisations and has the merit of incentivising clubs to play English players rather than just stockpiling them in squads, although it could make life more complicated for managers.
The proposal has yet to be put to the Home Office who, given their control of immigration, ultimately decide what systems are in place for sport.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 1:18 pm

I mentioned on another thread a couple of weeks back (as well as on here previously) that West Brom were in some financial difficulty - this story in the Mail about refinancing is troubling given the amount

West Brom hope to raise £70million
West Brom are seeking to raise £70million in fresh investment before the end of the season.

Sportsmail revealed earlier this month that the Championship club are talking to City banks about refinancing, although winning promotion to the Premier League would make such funding less urgent.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My take is that it looks like the Chinese government is restricting funds leaving the country again, which is forcing the club down this track

Too think that your club has wealthy backers is something a number of our fans want - the issues and politics that can come with that though are often not considered. To have your financial support dictated by the political whim of a foreign government who will never prioritise your club is too much of a risk for me

https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 1717361664

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:35 pm

this has been gaining some traction on social media today - @AndyhHolt laments at the lack of long term planning by the football authorities and a government that takes shots rather than forces solutions

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/12 ... 5091992577

and suggests what he would do if he was in charge at the EFL

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/12 ... 3743806465

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:40 pm

You may have read about a new fans team Dial Square FC (Arsenal's original name) being set up in protest of what Arsenal have become - but all is not what it seems in the press as the twohundredpercent blog and @uglygame clearly shows us

http://twohundredpercent.net/dial-squar ... ion-grift/

https://twitter.com/uglygame/status/1221067531378663425

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 4:57 pm

further to the @AndyhHolt posts today I would add these - they compliment the general feeling - first up @uglygame followed by the twohundredpercent blog

https://twitter.com/uglygame/status/1220670142604042241

http://twohundredpercent.net/corrupted- ... salvation/

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 8:06 pm

It is that time of year again - someone is in talks to buy Newcastle United - the reported price is close to what Ashley wants too - but the buyers are more commonly associated with he United of Manchester - I am far from convinced by this not least because of the involvement of Amanda Staveley (just who pays her commission) - from the Telegraph

Saudi Arabia's sovereign-wealth fund part of consortium in talks to buy Newcastle United for around £340m
Jason Burt, Chief Football Correspondent - 25 January 2020 • 2:28pm

consortium that is in talks to buy Newcastle United for £340million.

Telegraph Sport has been told by sources that the Public Investment Fund (PIF) is involved with investors that have been organised by financier Amanda Staveley.

A deal has not been agreed as yet with Newcastle owner Mike Ashley, who put the club up for sale in 2017, and there is no certainty it will go through but it is understood that detailed discussions have taken place.

If it is completed PIF will become the majority owner of the Premier League club taking an 80 per cent stake with Staveley’s company PCP Capital Limited and other backers covering the remaining 20 per cent.

The talks have been taking place for weeks with the consortium code-naming their plans “Project Zebra” - because of Newcastle’s black-and-white stripes.

If Staveley is successful it will be a personal as well as professional triumph for her given she has been attempting to buy Newcastle for almost two and a half years and has come in for fierce criticism.

News of a potential takeover will inevitably be met with scepticism among Newcastle fans who have seen several false dawns but the buyers are understood to be serious in their intent and are progressed with their plans.

The key – the game-changer, in fact, it appears - is the expected involvement of PIF, which is chaired by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, and the vast backing that potentially brings from the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund. Staveley was at the Future Investment Initiative (Saudis ‘Davos in the Desert’ event) in October and held talks with PIF.

The Saudis have been considering how best to make a move into football for some time and have examined buying other clubs. Questions will be asked to why, with their wealth, the Saudis want to bring in minority partners but it is not unusual to the way they structure deals.

The fund is central to Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030, a plan spearheaded by Prince Mohammed to diversify the economy away from oil and is also the driving force behind the country’s ambitions to develop new tourist and entertainment industries.

Telegraph Sport has established that it is hoped a deal will be announced soon. However other sources, concerned that it has become public, which has angered all parties, have urged caution and even suggested that it was still possible that the takeover might not proceed.

If the deal goes through it will cause excitement among Newcastle fans who have been disillusioned for a number of years and who will be desperate to see what the plans are for the future of the club. Newcastle were forced into an FA Cup replay away to League One Oxford United after a disappointing goalless draw on Saturday.

Ashley bought Newcastle for £134.4million in 2007 and the Sports Direct owner has proved an unpopular owner at St James’ Park. Newcastle have been relegated twice from the Premier League during Ashley’s reign with the businessman accused of failing to invest by supporters.

Staveley’s ability to buy Newcastle has been questioned despite a series of proposed bids with, at one point, sources close to Ashley releasing a statement claiming “attempts to reach a deal have proved to be exhausting, frustrating and a complete waste of time”.

If there is new ownership the level of investment in Newcastle remains to be seen but fans will be excited by the funds potentially available through the Saudi owners although it is understood that a plan of sustainable development will be put in place. Even so Newcastle can expect significant funds to be invested in the playing squad.

Newcastle declined to comment while Staveley could not be contacted.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sat Jan 25, 2020 8:11 pm

Jonathan Wilson in the Guardian in an article which summarises about half the content of this thread for the last few months

https://www.theguardian.com/football/bl ... -world-cup

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:28 am

This article in the Independent is ostensibly about the Shrewsbury-Liverpool match tomorrow. In reality it is about the superpower clubs and how they are at a level of advantage that no one else can compete with

https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/foo ... 01321.html

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:37 am

More detail in that Newcastle bid from the original source - The Wall Street Journal

Saudi Sovereign-Wealth Fund in Talks to Buy U.K. Soccer Team Newcastle United
The acquisition would be a major coup for Saudi Arabia as it focuses on sports and entertainment
By Bradley Hope, Rory Jones and Joshua Robinson - Updated Jan. 25, 2020 3:12 pm ET

Saudi Arabia’s sovereign-wealth fund is in talks to buy U.K. Premier League soccer team Newcastle United F.C. for about £340 million ($445 million), according to people familiar with the discussions.

The buyer is the Public Investment Fund, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s key investment tool, together with a group of investors organized by British financier Amanda Staveley, the people said. A final deal could be days or weeks away, the people said. The tentative deal could still break down.

The seller is British businessman Mike Ashley, who bought the team in 2007 for 134 million pounds, and turned into one of the least popular owners in English soccer.

The acquisition would be a major coup for Saudi Arabia as it focuses on sports and entertainment as part of Prince Mohammed’s economic reform plans for the kingdom.

It could also mean a big infusion of capital into Newcastle akin to Abu Dhabi’s 2008 acquisition of Manchester City. Since then the city-state, capital of the United Arab Emirates, has spent over a billion pounds to amass playing talent, renovate the team’s facilities, and turn City into an era-defining team in the English Premier League.

The Newcastle acquisition talks are being led up by Ms. Staveley, a financier who bet big on building relationships in the U.A.E. in the late 2000s. She led Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed al Nahyan’s multibillion pound bailout of Barclays bank in 2008. And she previously was involved in the deal that led to Sheikh Mansour’s takeover of Manchester City.

British billionaires David and Simon Reuben are part of the consortium of investors, according to people familiar with the matter. If the deal is pulled off, there are plans to potentially have Jamie Reuben, 33, David’s son, play an executive role at Newcastle, the people said.

Under the proposed deal, Ms. Staveley’s company will buy 10% of Newcastle using her private family wealth; the Reubens will take another 10% stake, and PIF will fund the remainder, the people familiar with the discussions said.

Newcastle has historically been one of the best attended clubs in the Premier League, drawing more than 50,000 a game last season despite mediocre results. But the club’s devoted fans, famous for removing their shirts in the northeast English weather, have had little to cheer during Mr. Ashley’s tenure. Over the past decade, the team has twice been demoted to English soccer’s second tier. Supporters laid the blame squarely on Mr. Ashley, accusing him of stinginess in the player transfer market and treating the fan base with general contempt. Chants of “Get out of our club” have become routine at Newcastle’s home stadium of St. James’ Park.

The club is currently in the bottom half of the Premier League standings with few prospects for major improvement this season.

Saudi Arabia’s aspirations to own a major soccer team have been brewing for years. Over the past few years, say people familiar with the matter, Saudi officials have discussed buying other Premier League teams. But Chelsea and Manchester United were each deemed too expensive, these people say.

So until now, its presence in the European game has amounted only to a few personal moves by Saudi investors, as opposed to the state-backed efforts of its neighbors Abu Dhabi and Qatar. Those investors include a member of the Saudi royal family, Prince Abdullah Bin Mosaad bin Abdulaziz al Saud, who acquired 50% of Sheffield United in 2013, and one of Prince Mohammed’s top aides, the Chairman of Saudi’s General Entertainment Authority Turki al-Sheikh, who bought Almeria in Spain’s second tier last summer.

Some of PIF’s direct investments in companies overseas, such as Uber Technologies Inc., have suffered paper losses. Its $45 billion commitment to SoftBank Group Corp. ’s Vision Fund also looks precarious after a series of investments, including WeWork, Slack Technologies Inc. and Uber have had a mixed performance in the last year. Those performance issues have caused the fund’s officials to consider buying a soccer club with a less-established global brand and building it into a more valuable asset, a person familiar with the fund’s thinking said. PIF says it is a long-term investor and aims to use the assets it owns to help diversify the Saudi economy from its dependence on oil.

Under Prince Mohammed, who rules Saudi Arabia day-to-day on behalf of his father King Salman, sports and entertainment has become a major focus after decades of restraint under previous kings who maintained an austere domestic environment.

In the past three months alone, the Kingdom has hosted a heavyweight prize fight, a $3 million tennis tournament, international motor racing, and a string of soccer matches featuring Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Vegas Claret » Sun Jan 26, 2020 2:27 am

I'd rather be a non-league team than be owned by Saudi's
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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:30 pm

the Derby County blog with a podcast on the latest financial issues facing the club with @KieranMaguire who gives a quick financial overview of Brighton in the build up

https://twitter.com/derbycountyblog/sta ... 6636805120

EDIT this is particularly informative on football finance and possibly the best discussion from @KieranMaguire I have heard
Last edited by Chester Perry on Sun Jan 26, 2020 1:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 12:33 pm

@AndyhHolt with more of his frustrations on EFL meetings - and a more vocal threat to leave football (can't see it yet)

https://twitter.com/AndyhHolt/status/12 ... 4115846146

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:35 pm

good to see that German clubs are getting behind Brondby's fans efforts to stop a potential takeover from Red Bull

https://twitter.com/matt_4d/status/1220805167144153088

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 6:14 pm

We have been this close on a deal for Newcastle before and they have pulled out - leak of potential deal could see it collapse

https://www.theguardian.com/football/20 ... atens-deal

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 7:45 pm

If you read yesterday's piece by Jonathan Wilson in the Guardian (linked above) you will find this sits well as a companion piece - from the New York Times

It’s Time to Ask What Africa Needs
Yes, Europe’s interests are important. But they shouldn’t be allowed to drive every decision in soccer.
Rory Smith - Jan. 25, 2020

The ideas just keep coming. From Europe’s leading clubs: a proposal to expand the Champions League, to squeeze four more lucrative matchdays into the competition’s format. From UEFA: a whole new trophy to win, but one for countries that feel (rightly) excluded from the Champions League.

From FIFA: another new tournament, this one in the summer and based on the Club World Cup — the one that was, in itself, an expansion of the old Intercontinental Cup — but bigger, richer, and more in China. And, as my colleague Tariq Panja reported this week, from Stephen M. Ross and his Relevent Sports team: a version of the International Champions Cup that is conspicuously more than a meaningless preseason moneymaking exercise.

They are all, for now, under consideration, despite the endless warnings from FIFPro — the global players’ union — and from a number of leading managers, not least Jürgen Klopp, that players are already facing the risk of burnout, that soccer is in danger of strangling its golden goose. The meetings still go on, in locked rooms and hushed tones in five-star hotels, the workshopping, the brainstorming. There is no such thing as a bad idea.

Last week, it was confirmed that this year’s African Cup of Nations — Africa’s equivalent of the Copa América, or the European Championship — would, in fact, be next year’s African Cup of Nations: Cameroon, the host, has noted that it is far too hot to play the tournament in June and July, and so it has shifted it, quite understandably, to January. (The fact its summer dates would have clashed with the new Club World Cup was a factor, too).

This is, in many ways, not a new idea: the Cup of Nations always used to be played in the (European) winter, until it was decided in 2017 that it should be played, instead, in the (European) summer.

The thinking was flawed — it did not require a meteorologist to work out that temperatures would rule out a swath of countries as potential hosts — but the logic was simple: pretty much all of Africa’s highest-profile players work for clubs in Europe. Switching it to the off-season made sense for them, and for their employers.

The switch back, then, is not exactly popular: Everyone in the corridors of power might be willing to contemplate almost any other proposal for new tournaments or ruining existing ones, but the restoration of a historic, important competition to its usual dates is universally seen as A Bad Thing. Have the African authorities not thought about what effect they will have on the integrity of the Premier League at all?

There will come a point when this Eurocentric thinking has to stop. Yes, that is where all the money is. Yes, that is the economic engine financing the global game. But it is not the limit of soccer’s horizons. It does not own the game.

Making sure everything works well for Europe will, eventually, have damaging consequences elsewhere: in terms of attendance and interest in local competitions (which has already happened across Africa) and, possibly, down the line, in the development of players. Europe has to start thinking of itself as the tip of the pyramid: the summit, yes, but in quite a bit of trouble if the rest of the edifice is not secure.

There is one idea for a new competition that appeals. It came, back in November, from an unlikely source: Gianni Infantino, president of FIFA, the concept that a stopped clock is right twice in a day fitted out in a finely-tailored suit. On a trip to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Infantino suggested that a Pan-African league should be under consideration.

His theory was, obviously, based on money: he thought that such a competition might be able to command revenues of $200 million a year. But there is a sound logic behind it.

Africa is home to a couple of dozen major clubs: Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates in South Africa; Al Ahly and Zamalek in Egypt; Espérance and Étoile du Sahel in Tunisia; DR Congo’s TP Mazembe; and Ghana’s Asante Kotoko, among others. A league of 20 teams, as Infantino suggested, would be of a far higher standard than any of the national competitions they currently call home.

That would be beneficial, of course, for players, and the prospect of selling continental broadcast rights would help improve facilities and infrastructure. It might, even, enable teams to hold on to some of their brightest prospects for just a little longer, delaying the exodus for Europe.

It might, in other words, provide the basis for another pole to emerge in soccer’s firmament: not enough to compete with Europe, but to rebalance things just a little. Soccer is weaker if western Europe has a monopoly on talent, on wealth, on power, as it does now. It is healthier if Africa — and Asia, North and South America and the rest — can make decisions without having to think how Europe will react. This might be a step on that road.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:07 pm

Interesting piece on how Ireland's kids are picked up by British clubs

https://www.the42.ie/irish-teenagers-mo ... 2-Jan2020/

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:29 am

Simon Chadwick shares my scepticism over the Saudi Arabia - Newcastle reports

https://twitter.com/Prof_Chadwick/statu ... 8465732609

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:21 am

@SwissRamble looks at the importance/impact of UEFA tv monies to Premier League clubs

https://twitter.com/SwissRamble/status/ ... 2231380993

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:24 am

The Price of Football Podcast with it's Monday Questions edition

https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/t ... 37b88c41ac

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:10 pm

The EU commission has come out and criticised Saudi Arabia for the illegal broadcasts of BeoutQ that include Premier League matches

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2020/ ... -eu-beoutq

so would the Premier League pass as fit and proper an owner (and state ruler) who allows these illegal broadcasts of their content or is the partnership all about getting that ownership across the line as they would not be directors - it might answer @TariqPanja('s) question

https://twitter.com/tariqpanja/status/1 ... 6784231424

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:52 pm

The Irish leagues (North and South) are in talks to consolidate - this is quite a significant story - how long before a combined Benelux or Scandinavian league - from the Telegraph

Talks begin over all-island Irish football league: 'Football is the one sport that cuts across all class and cultural divides'
Tim Wigmore - 27 January 2020 • 7:30am

Every week, thousands of Irish football fans – most from Northern Ireland, but many from the Republic, too – travel to Great Britain to watch matches in the Premier League or Scottish Premiership.

Kieran Lucid, a tech millionaire from County Kerry, wants to harness some of this passion and turn it towards a new concept: an all-island Irish football league.

“Football is still the most popular sport in Ireland,” Lucid says. “So, why is the domestic product so poor?” His answer, essentially, is that both domestic leagues on the island – the League of Ireland Premier Division and Northern Ireland Premiership – have been poorly promoted and financed.

To try to rectify this, Lucid and members of the All-Island League Advocacy Group will hold a series of meetings with players, coaches, fans, administrators and broadcasters in Belfast, Dublin and Dundalk from Monday. These aim to win support to create a new league.

“It’s all about raising standards – it’s about getting the public interested,” says Lucid. “You have thousands going to Glasgow and some to Edinburgh every weekend for Scottish games – but they have 1.2 million fewer people than we do in Ireland. What are they doing that we can’t do? The key thing is to show our own game a bit of love, our own towns and cities a bit of love.”

Lucid would have no involvement in the league after its creation; it would be wholly owned by the clubs. The All-Island League Advocacy Group is not out for profit; Lucid will not make any money from the idea if it is voted through, save being reimbursed his costs.

“This is a passion project for me. People often say, why are you doing this? It’s very irrational to be spending all your time doing this. But football’s full of irrational people.”

The passions football inspires are one reason for the opposition to Lucid’s plans. The Irish Football Association initially rejected the plans for a complete merger of the two leagues – in general, fans have also been more sceptical in Northern Ireland so far – but will be present in the meetings this week.

After failing in October with attempts for a complete merger, Lucid enlisted Hypercube, a Dutch sports consultancy, to come up with a more palatable alternative. Various options are possible, with a split-season approach now being pushed. This model would entail the two leagues continuing in the first half of each year. In the second half, the 10 Northern Ireland sides and 12 Republic teams would join in some form of combined league, which would crown an all-island champion.

It would be a radical shift, yet in a sense would merely bring football in line with other sports on the island, such as rugby, Gaelic games, cricket and hockey, which are organised on an all-Ireland basis.

Naturally, the political climate adds extra intrigue. “Whatever happens with Brexit, we just have to get on with it,” says Lucid. But he contends that by working together across the Irish border, “football can lead politics rather than lag politics”, pointing out: “Football is the one sport on the island that cuts across all class and cultural divides. We all love this game and we want to see our clubs move from surviving to thriving.”

Lucid’s central idea is that the two Irish leagues punch way below their weight, while others from countries with a similar population and wealth – Scotland and Denmark – attract more fans, are far more lucrative and perform much better in Europe.

Last year, the Northern Ireland Premiership champions received less in prize money from the league than the £45,000 earned by the bottom club in Scottish League Two. Research by the football consultancy 21st Club finds that clubs from the Irish and Northern Irish top flights earn on average 89 per cent and 67 per cent less than could be predicted by the size and wealth of the nations’ economies.

A paucity of cash means that the standard of play in the two Irish top tiers is poor. Moldova, Armenia and Luxembourg are among the leagues which Uefa rate as stronger than the two Irish leagues, based on their performances in Europe. The average quality of matches in both Irish top-tier leagues is akin to games between leading teams in England’s National League North and South, according to 21st Club’s model. In a new cross-border Irish league, concentrating quality, the standard would rise to the lower half of League Two.

The real potential gains, though, would be if the new league raised substantial money. Discussions with broadcasters and sponsors, and Hypercube’s research, suggest that a full merged All-Island league could generate £5-8.5 million. This would be less using the split-season approach, but still a huge increase. More money, Lucid asserts, would allow teams to invest in better training facilities, retain their best players for longer and recruit better players.

“This has to happen,” says Lucid. “It’s more a question of when.”

He hopes that the league could launch in 2022. “Once the political will is there to do this, it could happen very quickly.”

While Uefa does not comment on hypothetical situations, it is known to be keen on exploring ideas that could help mid-sized leagues. Mergers “could be a strategic development in some European regions”, said a Uefa spokesperson.

The greater implications for European club football might be the most intriguing facet of the Irish plan. Globalisation has helped the clout of the big five leagues grow inexorably – combined, the big five now earn three times more than the top divisions in the other 50 Uefa members.

Schemes for merging leagues in smaller countries offer a counterpoint, however modest, to the big five; a potential way, at least, to stop the financial chasm becoming even greater still. The Baltic nations and even Belgium and Holland are other countries which have had discussions over either mergers or greater collaboration, such as transnational cup competitions. “In general,” says Omar Chaudhuri, the head of football intelligence at the 21st club., “We think cross-border leagues are the future for competitions outside the top five to seven major European countries.”

What plays out for Lucid’s plans this week, and the months to come, then, might not merely be an Irish question. It could also be a harbinger of what is to come in other European leagues in the years ahead.

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If it happens it will be interesting to see if UEFA/FIFA says they have to unify national teams

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 12:43 am

As if by magic a Deloitte study has revealed the financial benefits of a Benelux league - from Soccerex

https://www.soccerex.com/insight/articl ... ghts-deals

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 12:57 am

A detailed (if slightly gushing) insight into City Football Group and to it's use of tech

https://www.sportspromedia.com/from-the ... -interview

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:26 am

recently @SwissRamble posted about Champions League monies earned by Premier League clubs - The Done Deal blog have provide a useful companion piece explain the breakdown and distribution formulae that make it such an important and inherently unequal deistribution system that helps Europes top clubs maintain their advantage

https://www.danielgeey.com/post/how-cha ... eir-money/

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:29 am

Martin Samuel in the Mail on why he has doubts about The Newcastle sale going through

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... astle.html

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:38 am

So at lunchtime I speculated that the Premier League might not look too kindly on a Saudi Purchase of one of it's members - has the Mail followed the example of Lancslive and generated a story from posts on this message board

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/footb ... s-row.html

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:04 am

The first impact of Brexit could be first by the Premier League a little earlier than they thought - if these lawyers are right

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/football/20 ... -can-sign/

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by Chester Perry » Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:29 am

Not the first time we have heard that a minor sponsor of a football club have not paid their dues, is this the start of a trend, Huddersfield are not taking it lightly though - they have petitioned for their official mango flavoured fizzy coconut water sponsor to be wound up

https://twitter.com/KieranMaguire/statu ... 6155283463

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by superdimitri » Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:29 am

It's entirely theoretical but football managers take on Brexit is a ruling whereby players under the age of 23 can only be granted work permits if they have represented their country so many times.

It's actually not too different to how it is now with players outside the EU and could pose us some trouble if we plan on keeping O'Neill as he will require a work permit to play here.

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by RammyClaret61 » Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:58 am

superdimitri wrote:
Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:29 am
It's entirely theoretical but football managers take on Brexit is a ruling whereby players under the age of 23 can only be granted work permits if they have represented their country so many times.

It's actually not too different to how it is now with players outside the EU and could pose us some trouble if we plan on keeping O'Neill as he will require a work permit to play here.
Won’t O’Neill need one anyway being Australian?

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Re: Football's Magic Money Tree

Post by superdimitri » Tue Jan 28, 2020 4:12 am

RammyClaret61 wrote:
Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:58 am
Won’t O’Neill need one anyway being Australian?
Yes, but my point was just that he (if that ruling is passed) will be in the same shoes as any player from the EU under 23 too.

It could cause an issue for the clubs youth teams in the future, especially the bigger ones.

For us, players like Mumbongo who's Swedish may not be able to gain a work permit to even play in our youth team although any contracts will likely be seen out before work permits are agreed.

The club has an option on O'Neill for another year but it's likely he'll need a new work permit to play for us again and I wouldn't be surprised if it will be rejected on the grounds he hasn't played enough for his country.

Sad truth is, if this rule does come into effect all it will probably mean is the likes of Chelsea will just loan their youngsters to European clubs instead of British lower league ones.. This may favor Burnley and British youngsters or it could work against home grown players with teams targeting players like Gabriel Jesus who is young but has international appearances to his name.

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