Bank Scam Animals

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FactualFrank
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by FactualFrank » Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:57 pm

Regarding Facebook - try and log out especially if you use it on your mobile.

I can categorically say, after testing it many times (with made up things) that they 'listen' in on what you say and show adverts accordingly.

Billy Balfour
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by Billy Balfour » Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:34 pm

Regarding F@cebook - just don't do it unless and this includes everything else they own like Insta etc. You are basically signing away your right to a private life.

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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by Billy Balfour » Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:48 pm

Go to the website of the banks you use, though do make sure that you are actually on their sites and not a scammers. Then put all their phone numbers into your phone. This way you will know it's your bank if and when they phone, but even so, just remember that a bank will never ask for your password or for you to transfer money out of an account. Better still, tell them to send you an email or letter and end the conversation. Your bank will have your email address - so don't give it out.

FactualFrank
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by FactualFrank » Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:55 pm

Billy Balfour wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:48 pm
Go to the website of the banks you use, though do make sure that you are actually on their sites and not a scammers. Then put all their phone numbers into your phone. This way you will know it's your bank
Not that simple. There's many scammers who can phone you as if it were from your bank. In other words, if you're with HSBC, the HSBC number will appear on your phone even though it's not the bank calling.

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:03 pm

FactualFrank wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 2:57 pm
Regarding Facebook - try and log out especially if you use it on your mobile.

I can categorically say, after testing it many times (with made up things) that they 'listen' in on what you say and show adverts accordingly.
I can assure you that is exactly what they do. I used to work on internet marketing and specialised in Facebook advertising. If you place an ad for a company you ask them for a customer demographic then you go into Facebook's ad section and place that demographic in amongst the ad requirements. Facebook records literally all you post so if the demographic is, for instance, a one legged unicycle rider aged between 18 and 40 who also has an interest in skiing and camping FB will find those people and they will see the ad. Age and/or gender filtering is the norm and then other things like hobbies and pastimes or even what they do for a living can be added. It's that targeted I actually once placed an ad for a naturist campsite and my demographic was adults over 18, interested in naturism, nudity and health(?). I know it found it's targets because you then monitor the results by the number of times the ad is clicked on by the viewer (yes even your clicks on ads are recorded). The possibilities really are almost endless.

Facebook themselves rarely place any ads unless it's for their own publicity.

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:08 pm

FactualFrank wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:55 pm
Not that simple. There's many scammers who can phone you as if it were from your bank. In other words, if you're with HSBC, the HSBC number will appear on your phone even though it's not the bank calling.
Just this. The number when my daughter was caught was displayed and it matched the number on her bank card.

FactualFrank
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by FactualFrank » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:09 pm

houseboy wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:03 pm
I can assure you that is exactly what they do. I used to work on internet marketing and specialised in Facebook advertising. If you place an ad for a company you ask them for a customer demographic then you go into Facebook's ad section and place that demographic in amongst the ad requirements. Facebook records literally all you post so if the demographic is, for instance, a one legged unicycle rider aged between 18 and 40 who also has an interest in skiing and camping FB will find those people and they will see the ad. Age and/or gender filtering is the norm and then other things like hobbies and pastimes or even what they do for a living can be added. It's that targeted I actually once placed an ad for a naturist campsite and my demographic was adults over 18, interested in naturism, nudity and health(?). I know it found it's targets because you then monitor the results by the number of times the ad is clicked on by the viewer (yes even your clicks on ads are recorded). The possibilities really are almost endless.

Facebook themselves rarely place any ads unless it's for their own publicity.
Yeah I sometimes still work in Facebook advertising and the demographics, age and interest can be found on your profile, but they certainly keep tabs on your browsing.

But I'm referring to them physically listening (via your phone's mic) what you are saying and they pick up words you say.

One of many examples, I don't shop at Asda and haven't been in years. But I was at my sister's and she asked if I could look after my nephews whilst she nipped to Asda. Sure enough, I opened Facebook a few minutes later and a voucher for Asda appeared.

Billy Balfour
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by Billy Balfour » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:14 pm

FactualFrank wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 3:55 pm
Not that simple. There's many scammers who can phone you as if it were from your bank. In other words, if you're with HSBC, the HSBC number will appear on your phone even though it's not the bank calling.
Aye spoofing. Fair point, but the rest still stands. Just don't give any info out whatsoever.

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:17 pm

FactualFrank wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:09 pm
Yeah I sometimes still work in Facebook advertising and the demographics, age and interest can be found on your profile, but they certainly keep tabs on your browsing.

But I'm referring to them physically listening (via your phone's mic) what you are saying and they pick up words you say.

One of many examples, I don't shop at Asda and haven't been in years. But I was at my sister's and she asked if I could look after my nephews whilst she nipped to Asda. Sure enough, I opened Facebook a few minutes later and a voucher for Asda appeared.
It is all quite scary mate. An old mate of mine is convinced (bizarrely) that YouTube monitors you through the telly. He said he goes on there and the kind of music he listens to comes up without him even putting in a search. It does actually, I've since tried it, but I think that is just monitoring your history of searches. It makes you think though.

Foshiznik
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by Foshiznik » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:21 pm

The technology for banking is there and isn't being utilised. People on here making out as if its a bad thing that you can cash a cheque, transfer money, live chat and apply for more financial bank products all via the bank's own app don't understand that times are changing with the consumer requirements. I guarantee that most banks in the future will be online only.

With regards to banks calling customers, they will only do this if you opt in or use phone banking rather than online.

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:51 pm

Foshiznik wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:21 pm
The technology for banking is there and isn't being utilised. People on here making out as if its a bad thing that you can cash a cheque, transfer money, live chat and apply for more financial bank products all via the bank's own app don't understand that times are changing with the consumer requirements. I guarantee that most banks in the future will be online only.

With regards to banks calling customers, they will only do this if you opt in or use phone banking rather than online.
I've been called by my bank and never opted in and didn't have telephone banking at the time, it's done in the name of security if they think there is anything untoward. Case in point:I bought a bunk bed some time ago but inadvertently clicked twice as I was checking out (online of course) and wound up buying two. Bank called me the first thing the day after and asked if the transactions where genuine, obviously it was an error and I contacted the company concerned and they cancelled one off. I was also contacted about a foreign payment which I had made. So, yes they do call. The Natwest have told my daughter the same thing. I don't know quite why people keep saying they don't call when the bank have told my daughter that they do and I know for a fact they have with me. Banks absolutely DO call for security reasons.
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boatshed bill
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by boatshed bill » Tue Dec 10, 2019 6:42 pm

I got done for three relatively small sums last month, someone used my card details. Apparently these criminals try their luck with small sums first before going for a bigger amount. It was pure luck that I spotted one dodgy transaction and phoned my bank immediately. They refunded the money too.

Hipper
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by Hipper » Tue Dec 10, 2019 8:00 pm

Houseboy - are you able to tell us what sort of information the scammers had? You mentioned the banks telephone number - what else? Did they have personal banking details and if so how is it thought they got them?

Bosscat
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by Bosscat » Wed Dec 11, 2019 12:15 pm

Skipton Building society warning email today.....

The ‘Authorised Push Payment’ scam
What is it?
Scammers pretend to be from a trusted organisation like the police or a well-known company.

They’ll say your bank account has been compromised and that you need to move your money to a ‘safe’ account, which in reality belongs to them.

They might ask you to download software that lets them access your computer, so they can take money from your account.

How to avoid it
Question who you’re talking to – they might know basic details about you and seem to be from a company you know, but it might be a fake number. If you’re not certain, hang up and call them on the number you’d usually use or one from their website and ask if the call was genuine.

Take a minute to think – what are they asking you to do? Would BT call you about your bank account? Are they putting pressure on you to act quickly? If they are, it’s probably a scam.

It’s OK to say no – If something doesn’t sound right – chances are it’s not!
Be confident to put the phone down and call the real number listed on the company’s website.

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:56 pm

Hipper wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 8:00 pm
Houseboy - are you able to tell us what sort of information the scammers had? You mentioned the banks telephone number - what else? Did they have personal banking details and if so how is it thought they got them?
They had the bank details but obviously no pin or passwords. Bank details can be got from anywhere if if someone is even slightly dodgy. Anyone who takes payments over the phone can get those, I used to, but they are not much good without a pin or the security code on the back of the card. The only thing that anyone can do with your bank details without knowing any security details is actually deposit money into it. The rest of the scam is done mainly by getting you to confirm what they don't know but say they do, if you get my drift. And they do that by asking questions that don't appear to be questions. But the way they did it they didn't even need the security bank details because they were so convincing that my daughter just assumed, wrongly obviously, that she was speaking to the bank. They didn't even ask her for any security details or pin numbers because they were following a bank script that would be used in the event of any suspicious activity. The only thing she did wrong was make the mistake (very easy in this instance) of thinking she was talking to the bank, especially when they actually encouraged her to call the bank on the number on her card.
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houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:58 pm

Bosscat wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 12:15 pm
Skipton Building society warning email today.....

The ‘Authorised Push Payment’ scam
What is it?
Scammers pretend to be from a trusted organisation like the police or a well-known company.

They’ll say your bank account has been compromised and that you need to move your money to a ‘safe’ account, which in reality belongs to them.

They might ask you to download software that lets them access your computer, so they can take money from your account.

How to avoid it
Question who you’re talking to – they might know basic details about you and seem to be from a company you know, but it might be a fake number. If you’re not certain, hang up and call them on the number you’d usually use or one from their website and ask if the call was genuine.

Take a minute to think – what are they asking you to do? Would BT call you about your bank account? Are they putting pressure on you to act quickly? If they are, it’s probably a scam.

It’s OK to say no – If something doesn’t sound right – chances are it’s not!
Be confident to put the phone down and call the real number listed on the company’s website.
That pretty much mirrors what the Yorkshire bank said to me Boss. The only main difference is they told me not to engage them in ANY conversation at all. If it is the bank calling they absolutely do not mind being hung up on for people to check.

FactualFrank
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by FactualFrank » Wed Dec 11, 2019 3:04 pm

houseboy wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:56 pm
They had the bank details but obviously no pin or passwords. Bank details can be got from anywhere if if someone is even slightly dodgy. Anyone who takes payments over the phone can get those, I used to, but they are not much good without a pin or the security code on the back of the card. The only thing that anyone can do with your bank details without knowing any security details is actually deposit money into it. The rest of the scam is done mainly by getting you to confirm what they don't know but say they do, if you get my drift. And they do that by asking questions that don't appear to be questions. But the way they did it they didn't even need the security bank details because they were so convincing that my daughter just assumed, wrongly obviously, that she was speaking to the bank. They didn't even ask her for any security details or pin numbers because they were following a bank script that would be used in the event of any suspicious activity. The only thing she did wrong was make the mistake (very easy in this instance) of thinking she was talking to the bank, especially when they actually encouraged her to call the bank on the number on her card.
I guess the big question is what information she actually gave without realising, which she may not know. You'd think the bank would know everything the scammers would have needed to have knowledge of, in order to make the transfer.

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Wed Dec 11, 2019 3:20 pm

FactualFrank wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 3:04 pm
I guess the big question is what information she actually gave without realising, which she may not know. You'd think the bank would know everything the scammers would have needed to have knowledge of, in order to make the transfer.
True. In the event there is now a major investigation going on involving both her banks and a chap at the Natwest has taken the whole thing on and has said he will do all he can to get the money returned, even if it is not given as good will by the other bank (which may well happen because it is eager to avoid bad publicity is seems). He has said he will oversee the whole affair, even if it goes to a claim against the other bank, which again is a very real road that can be gone down. In the end she'll get the money off me so anything that comes from all this will theoretically be mine.

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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by cbx750 » Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:09 pm

houseboy wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 2:56 pm
The only thing that anyone can do with your bank details without knowing any security details is actually deposit money into it.
That's what Jeremy Clarkson thought when he published his in a paper, then a charity set up a direct debit and took £500.
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FactualFrank
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by FactualFrank » Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:12 pm

cbx750 wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:09 pm
That's what Jeremy Clarkson thought when he published his in a paper, then a charity set up a direct debit and took £500.
Yeah I remember that: https://www.theguardian.com/money/2008/ ... msandfraud

houseboy
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Re: Bank Scam Animals

Post by houseboy » Thu Dec 12, 2019 9:13 am

cbx750 wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:09 pm
That's what Jeremy Clarkson thought when he published his in a paper, then a charity set up a direct debit and took £500.
But they were immediately identified and would never have go away with it. You have to go through identifiable security to set up a direct debit.

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